Those of you who know me know that my boyfriend, Rajan, is from Nepal. He has definitely been a great inspiration for me in my quest to try cooking new things. Many of the cookbooks I have gotten in recent years have been from him, and he is the happy recipient of a great many meals from those cookbooks. The first cookbook he ever gave to me is called A Taste of Nepal, and it is by far the most used cookbook on my shelf.

The most-used cookbook I own: A Taste of Nepal
The most-used cookbook I own: A Taste of Nepal

Needless to say, because my boyfriend is from Nepal, this is not the only time the tiny, but mighty, country will be making an appearance on this blog. I make Nepali food about once a week, even when Rajan is out of town.

The last two weeks before this were an extremely joyous time in Nepal. Nepali people just celebrated Dashain, which is a huge ten-day holiday that is equivalent to the status of Christmas here in the states. It’s a time for family, friends, and delicious food. Most notably, it is a time when Nepali people eat goat. I knew Rajan was arriving in Northern Nevada on the final day of Dashain, so I decided to tackle a goat curry recipe that I had had my eye on for quite some time in my Nepali cookbook.

Raw goat -- 3.5 pounds of it, courtesy of a local Mexican grocery store.
Raw goat — 3.5 pounds of it, courtesy of a local Mexican grocery store.

I was a little curious about where I would get goat in Northern Nevada, especially a gelded (or young) goat. It makes a *huge* difference in the taste of the meat if the goat has not been gelded. It becomes overly game-y tasting if it is not gelded. However, my Nepali friends told me about a Hispanic grocery store in Reno that sold gelded goat, and I was in business.

Potato and green bean side dish
Potato and green bean side dish

I often describe goat as being a “slightly gamier lamb” to people who haven’t had it before. Generally, if you like lamb, you will like goat.

Rukesh and Rajan waiting for the goat to cook.
Rukesh and Rajan waiting for the goat to cook.

Goat is a tough meat, and it always takes a bit of time to prepare. The first time Rajan ever made goat for me, he prepared it in a pressure cooker to cut down on the cook time. I followed the recipe exactly for this version, which calls for almost an hour of actual cook time. With chopping an seasoning, set aside a couple hours before making this dish.

Rajan, Adam, Maria, and Rukesh get ready to dig in.
Rajan, Adam, Maria, and Rukesh get ready to dig in.

Because we were celebrating Dashain, I had to invite friends over. Rukesh, Adam, and Maria all agreed to partake in this particular adventure for the blog. I cheated a little, because I asked Adam and Maria if they had ever had goat beforehand (they had).

The whole feast.
The whole feast.

I served the goat curry with rice, daal, and a green bean and potato side dish. Rice and daal are Nepali meal staples.

After a few bites, Rukesh proclaimed that the curry tasted “just like in Nepal.” And really, what better compliment can I receive than that?

Find the recipe here. Order the awesome book here.

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